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    • Percentage of ethanol in nation's gasoline set to increase in 2020 - E15 will now also be sold year round

      This is a major win for farmers selling corn who lobbied the Trump administration regarding larger purchases of ethanol. What does this mean for car enthusiasts? It means more ethanol. You will see more ethanol in your gasoline and E15 will see greater adoption.


      Here is what to expect:

      • In a forthcoming supplemental notice building off the recently proposed 2020 Renewable Volume Standards and the Biomass-Based Diesel Volume for 2021, EPA will propose and request public comment on expanding biofuel requirements beginning in 2020.
        • EPA will seek comment on actions to ensure that more than 15 billion gallons of conventional ethanol be blended into the nationís fuel supply beginning in 2020, and that the volume obligation for biomass-based diesel is met. This will include accounting for relief expected to be provided for small refineries.
        • EPA intends to take final action on this front later this year.
        • In the most recent compliance year, EPA granted 31 small refinery exemptions.

      • Building on the Presidentís earlier decision to allow year-round sales of E15, EPA will initiate a rulemaking process to streamline labeling and remove other barriers to the sale of E15.
      • EPA will continue to evaluate options for RIN market transparency and reform.
      • USDA will seek opportunities through the budget process to consider infrastructure projects to facilitate higher biofuel blends.
      • The Administration will continue to work to address ethanol and biodiesel trade issues.

      More ethanol will be blended into our gasoline as a whole in the USA but an exact percentage is not stated above. It seems 15% will be the number.

      We should all also see greater ethanol supplies in general. For auto enthusiasts, hopefully this means more E85 pumps.

      Farmers successfully lobbied for increased ethanol sales wile the EPA initially was against it.

      The turnabout by the administration came amid a backlash at its decision over the summer to exempt more oil refineries from a requirement to include ethanol, a biofuel often derived from corn, in their blends. About 40 percent of the countryís corn crop goes to ethanol, and a drop in demand for the product quickly rippled through the rural economy in places like Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota and Ohio, all politically mixed states that Mr. Trump hopes to carry next year.
      What this all means is there is going to be a lot more ethanol from 2020 on.

      Earlier this year, Mr. Trump received praise from farmers for taking steps to allow E15, a gasoline blend with 15 percent ethanol, to be used year-round. But his administration has also frequently exempted small refineries from requirements to blend ethanol into their fuels.

      Under the proposed rules announced by the administration on Friday, the E.P.A. will seek to expand to 15 billion gallons the amount of ethanol blended into the fuel supply, starting in 2020. The announcement also called for easing the process for selling E15 and expanding the export market for ethanol.
      Source

      This article was originally published in forum thread: Percentage of ethanol in nation's gasoline set to increase in 2020 - E15 will now also be sold year round started by Sticky View original post
      Comments 10 Comments
      1. Bowser330's Avatar
        Bowser330 -
        Why was the EPA against more cleaner burning ethanol in our fuel...doesn't make sense
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Bowser330 Click here to enlarge
        Why was the EPA against more cleaner burning ethanol in our fuel...doesn't make sense
        Several reasons I would assume.

        The amount of water used for corn and the land cleared to grow it. The national gasoline demand is at 2003 levels due to fuel efficiency rising so more ethanol isn't needed. Also, the impact on older vehicles.

        I'm not sure what else.
      1. Bowser330's Avatar
        Bowser330 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Several reasons I would assume.

        The amount of water used for corn and the land cleared to grow it. The national gasoline demand is at 2003 levels due to fuel efficiency rising so more ethanol isn't needed. Also, the impact on older vehicles.

        I'm not sure what else.
        https://www.wired.com/2011/06/five-e...yths-busted-2/

        Myth No. 4: Ethanol requires too much water to produce. ——————————————————-

        False. The amount of water used to make ethanol has declined dramatically. Today, producing one gallon of ethanol requires about 3.5 gallons of water. That's a little more than it takes to process a gallon of gasoline. Much of the criticism about ethanol's water requirements stem from the need to irrigate feedstock crops in drier climates. But most ethanol is produced from rain-fed crops grown in the Midwest.



        In addition, ethanol is not carcinogenic and doesn't poison groundwater or the ocean. Ethanol rapidly biodegrades. Concerns over ethanol spills are muted by ethanol's low toxicity. In fact, you'll find ethanol in beer, bourbon and other happy-hour beverages you've probably consumed.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Bowser330 Click here to enlarge
        https://www.wired.com/2011/06/five-e...yths-busted-2/

        Myth No. 4: Ethanol requires too much water to produce. ——————————————————-

        False. The amount of water used to make ethanol has declined dramatically. Today, producing one gallon of ethanol requires about 3.5 gallons of water. That's a little more than it takes to process a gallon of gasoline. Much of the criticism about ethanol's water requirements stem from the need to irrigate feedstock crops in drier climates. But most ethanol is produced from rain-fed crops grown in the Midwest.



        In addition, ethanol is not carcinogenic and doesn't poison groundwater or the ocean. Ethanol rapidly biodegrades. Concerns over ethanol spills are muted by ethanol's low toxicity. In fact, you'll find ethanol in beer, bourbon and other happy-hour beverages you've probably consumed.
        Well then the EPA probably just hates farmers, Trump, and car enthusiasts.
      1. Eleventeen's Avatar
        Eleventeen -
        One argument I’ve seen against ethanol is the amount of diesel needed to produce ethanol, and the additional pollution produced burning said diesel.
      1. maxnix's Avatar
        maxnix -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Several reasons I would assume.

        The amount of water used for corn and the land cleared to grow it. The national gasoline demand is at 2003 levels due to fuel efficiency rising so more ethanol isn't needed. Also, the impact on older vehicles.

        I'm not sure what else.
        Surely a desire for more advanced engine timing and less knock.

        Since the federal gasoline tax is flat, it is thus raised since each gallon will have less energy and there fore consumption will rise. This change will play havoc with EPA fuel economy ratings. One wonders if BMW and others will increase fuel capacity by 5%-10%? Space probably not there for cars designed for 10% ethanol.
      1. maxnix's Avatar
        maxnix -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Eleventeen Click here to enlarge
        One argument Iíve seen against ethanol is the amount of diesel needed to produce ethanol, and the additional pollution produced burning said diesel.
        Oh yeah! Corporate farming is all about petroleum fuel and petroleum based crop chemicals.
      1. maxnix's Avatar
        maxnix -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Bowser330 Click here to enlarge
        But most ethanol is produced from rain-fed crops grown in the Midwest.
        Oh, you mean where the dust bowl was in the 1920s?
      1. vrsixxxxxx's Avatar
        vrsixxxxxx -
        e85 for the whole world
      1. Bowser330's Avatar
        Bowser330 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by maxnix Click here to enlarge
        Oh, you mean where the dust bowl was in the 1920s?
        No.

        First off it was 1930-1936 & 1939/40

        Secondly the arid areas where the dustbowl affected most were most of Kansas, north Texas, eastern Colorado and western oklahoma.

        More corn is produced north of those states in Nebraska, Iowa and Illinios